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Introduction
Diamond- a simple pronouncement of the word produces an image of a scintillating flawlessly white stone in front of our eyes. It is exalted as the gem symbolizing passion, a sparkling epitome of sheer whiteness. A chemically pure and structurally perfect diamond is absolutely transparent without any reflection or hue of any color. Diamonds are acclaimed and valued for this colorless appeal. However, it is a very rare phenomenon, rather they are no truly colorless; almost all diamonds display slightly yellowish or brownish tints. Only one-fourth of the total number of diamonds found can be graded colorless.
The color of a diamond may be affected by chemical impurities and/or structural defects in the crystal composition. The color inclusion depending on the intensity may either increase or decrease the value of a diamond. Diamonds emitting faint hues, that mar the whiteness of the colorless diamonds are considered low grade. On the contrary, if the intensity of the same hue is higher and uniform, the value of such diamonds is far more than their flawless white counterparts.  For instance intense blue or vivid pink diamonds being extremely rare, may be valued fifty percent more than a best graded colorless diamond.
Diamonds are available in almost all colors and shades. More than 300 myriad diamond colors have been identified so far, varying from black, blue, red, yellow, green gray and brown. Diamonds that are of red, pink, intense yellow, brown, or any other color are called fancy color diamonds.
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Meaning- Color in Colorless Diamonds

Color in a colorless white diamond refers to the inclusion of yellowish or brownish hues of the crystal. Since diamonds are formed in the bowls of the earth, often impurities and chemicals taint its whiteness. Color may be a result of contact with external bodies or chemical during the diamond creation process. These impurities result in giving a diamond yellow or brown shade. For example, nitrogen, the most common impurity, causes a slight to intense yellow coloration depending upon the type and concentration of nitrogen present. Yellow or Brown are the most common diamond colors, blue is not as frequent pink, green and red being the rarest. In fact the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) classifies low saturation yellow and brown diamonds as diamonds in the normal color range, and applies a grading scale from 'D' (colorless) to 'Z' (light yellow). Flawless white diamonds are very rare; they are more valued as they allow maximum refraction of light resulting in unbelievable brilliance.
To sum up, the lesser the presence of these tints, the more is the value of a white diamond. Traces of color and impurities visible to the naked eye may depreciate the diamond value. However, the same rule does not apply for the fancy or colored diamonds. They are valued on the basis of the intensity and uniformity of the color in the diamond.
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Other Factors influencing diamond Color

We frequently refer to the brilliance of the diamond; it is the play of light, its refraction and dispersion that results in giving a diamond a dazzling appeal. Diamond acts like a prism that splits white light into a spectrum of colors and reflects back this beam of light to make a diamond sparkle. Diamond color can also be influenced by its fluorescence, dispersion of light and artificial irradiation. Let us understand how other factors may influence the diamond color.
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Fluorescence
Diamonds are also evaluated on the parameters of the fluorescence. Most diamonds when the held under the ultraviolet light or black light it will emit a colored glow known as fluorescence. This fluorescence causes diamond to change its color when subjected to the ultraviolet light. Ultraviolet light surrounds us as part of the sunlight and is also present in the light of the fluorescent light-bulbs. This light may cause the diamond to look whiter or yellowish. Diamonds that emit blue fluorescence in ultraviolet light may correct the actual yellow tint of the stone making the stone look white. It can also be said that the diamonds graded yellow emit blue fluorescence degree may vary. On the contrary, a diamond that emits yellow fluorescence may look very white under incandescent lights.
This attribute may cause the diamond to look different in the normal light at home. It is suggested to buy diamonds from a reputable retailer, to avoid any cheating on color and quality.  An important fact to note, a strong fluorescence in the diamond may cause the stone to appear cloudy. The GIA and other lab reports specify the amount of fluorescence a diamond displays, in the diamond grading report. The fluorescence of the diamonds is graded as Faint, Medium, strong and very strong. There are many who prefer these diamonds for its unique aesthetics.
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The dispersion of the diamond
Dispersion is a scientific term referring to the fragmentation of a single beam of light into a rainbow colors, by a transparent crystal. It influences the brilliance of the colorless diamond, making it look whiter. Diamond, like a prism breaks (disperses) the white light into a separate spectral of colors. Different spectral colors re-combine to create new spectrals, when all of these spectral colors overlap in a balanced fashion, what our eyes see is - white light. However, if some spectral colors are missing or are weak in intensity, we will see a resultant color, as a combination of those colors that are present in the spectral and stronger. For instance, we would see orange light if only orange wavelengths were present, but we might also see this if orange wavelengths were absent but red and yellow wavelengths were present. Thus, because of dispersion some diamonds appear brighter and other just display faint nuances of color.
The dispersion of the diamond is in turn influenced by the refractive index (RI) of the beam of light. The RI determines how the white light will be divided into a spectrum of colors. It indicates how much a beam of light will bend, as different color wavelengths refract or bend by different amounts. Violet light bends the highest, diamond has the maximum RI for violet, while red light bends the least. The refractive index for every diamond is different and varies according to the wavelength (colors) of the light. The shorter wavelengths of light are curved more than the longer wavelength when passing the colorless substance. Consequently, if the spectrum of the colors remain more separated from each other, the result leads to poor brilliance. Every diamond displays dispersion, but it can be improved or corrected with a better cut and individual polish.
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Diamond Color Grading Process
The internationally recognized laborites like GIA and AGS have laid down stringent procedures for grading the colorless diamonds. These reputed laboratories determine each diamonds color grade, in a controlled environment and lighting, on a scale of D to Z. The process involves a scrupulous comparing of the each diamond against a set of diamonds called the- master-stone diamond set. Often a single diamond is evaluated by a minimum of three separate gemologists without the knowledge of the previous gemologist’s determination, to insure objectivity and accuracy.
The diamonds are graded using a 10X loupe, which is a ten-power magnification apparatus. The diamond is placed table-down, and pavilion-up, for evaluation. The 10X loupe is the magnifying apparatus used regularly by the gemologists, this however indicates that a higher magnifying loupe might show inclusions in a diamond otherwise graded flawless.
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Color Grading of White Diamonds

The internationally reputed gemological institutes like GIA use an alphabetical scale from ‘D’ to ‘Z’ to grade the diamond color. D-olorless- is the best grade, diamond belonging to this category show absence of any color, while Z is the lowest grade displaying dark yellow tinge. The diamonds that are darker than K color display a brown tinge and are notified with explanatory phrase such as –M- faint Brown. Diamonds bearing more color than the Z fall in the category of fancy colored diamonds. The white colorless diamonds can be categorized as follows: colorless, faintly tinted (generally yellow), lightly tinted (usually yellow) and tinted (typically yellow but progressing towards the brownish). The higher the tint of yellowness in the diamond, the lesser its value on the grade standards.

D-F- Colorless- extremely rare and most expensive.
D- Absolutely colorless- D is the highest color grade. The diamonds found in this category are very rare, as a result very expensive.
E- Colorless- minuscule traces of color can be noticed only by a trained gemologist using a 10X loupe.
F- Colorless- Small color traces can be detected by only an expert gemologist. However, a diamond belonging to this category is conceived as "colorless". It is a first-rate diamond.
I-J Near-colorless- Slight taints of color more or less noticeable.
K-L-M- Faint Yellow- Faintly tinted, usually yellowish.
N-O-P-Q-R-Very Light Yellow-Lightly tinted, usually yellow. The color tint can be seen with the naked eye.
S-T-U-V-W-X-Y-Z- Light Yellow- Tinted, usually yellow, may progress to brownish. Tint noticeable to the naked eye, even when mounted.

* MySolitaire was does not offer diamonds below grade J, K-M and N-Z.

Diamond Color Scale or Grading for
White or Colorless Diamonds

Color

 Diamond Color Scale or Grading

Colorless
D E F

Diamond
Grade D
Grade E
Grade F

Most Expensive & Desirable
Near Colorless
G H I J
Grade G
Grade H
Grade I
Grade J
Faint Yellow
K L M
Grade K
Grade L
Color Grade M
Very Light Yellow
N O P R
Grade N
Grade O
Grade P
Grade R
Dark Yellow
S T U V W X Y Z

Grade S
Grade T
Grade U
Grade V
Grade W
Grade X
Grade Y
Grade Z

Cheapest & Least Desirable

Color

 Diamond Color Scale or Grading
Diamond Color Scale or Grading for
White or Colorless Diamonds
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Value and Diamonds Color
If you are looking for a diamond for a good value you should opt for G-I grade diamonds that shows no noticeable trace of color. A medium or strong fluorescence grade too can be a wise choice option. But if you want to stay on the budget and settle for nothing less in the color grade then the best choose will be SI1-SI2 clarity or a strong fluorescent stone, if you like the aesthetics of the diamond’s fluorescence. MySolitaire does not offer diamond that belong to category below the G grade.
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Devices Used For Color Grading

Gran Colorimeter is the electronic device used by many gemologists to determine the diamond grade. It evaluates loose diamond grades-from D to Z to Fancy and Intense keeping the ±½ accuracy. It can evaluate diamonds as small as 0.25 to as big as 10 carats, using the desirable grading scale GIA, IGI GEM, HRD, AGS, etc. The Gran colorimeter was first invented in 1972 by Paul Gran at Gran Computer Industries Ltd. A photo-detector is used for detecting the light that comes forth from the diamond through its table facet. A mounted stone grade has a precise accuracy within ±1 color grade. Moreover, apart from grading the diamonds in a color range, it also specifies the grade into various levels. Like a diamond i.e. "G" color, the Gran Colorimeter will also notify ‘high G’ or a ‘low G.’
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Diamond Color certificates
The color certificates specify the color grade of the diamond along with the diamond carat weight. GIA, IGI GEM, HRD, AGS and other international recognized laborites give color certificates. The certificates also confirm if the diamond is treated or is natural. All loose diamonds sold at My Solitaire’s are authenticated by GIA and are accompanied by GIA certificates.
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How a diamond's Color affects its value
The diamond’s color grades significantly affect its cost. The colorless diamonds are the most coveted, however are very rare as a result more expensive. In simple terms the higher the grade scale, the more costly will be the diamond. Hence as a diamond of a particular carat, clarity, and cut moves up to next color grade there will be considerable increase or decrease in its price value per carat.
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How can the cut and setting enhance the color?

An extensively faceted cut like the brilliant cut can actually improve the color of the diamond. On the other hand, the flat faceted cuts are unable to hide the color inclusions in the diamond. The white metal setting such as platinum or white gold will check the color of diamond belonging to lower grades. Colorless diamonds being almost transparent display the nuances of the metal used in the settings. A yellow metal setting makes the diamond emit a fiery effect where as a whiter metal will make a yellowish diamond look whiter. High prong settings can also get the same effect to make the diamond look whiter, where channel setting or other sunken settings bring out the natural color of the stone. The diamond shapes of emerald or asscher too display more color compared to the brilliant cut due to the flat faceting. Especially a white metal bezel style setting in white diamond will perform better to make the color of your diamond appear whiter.
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Color Enhancements and Treatments

An extensively faceted cut like the brilliant cut can actually improve the color of the diamond. On the other hand, the flat faceted cuts are unable to hide the color inclusions in the diamond. The white metal setting such as platinum or white gold will check the color of diamond belonging to lower grades. Colorless diamonds being almost transparent display the nuances of the metal used in the settings. A yellow metal setting makes the diamond emit a fiery effect where as a whiter metal will make a yellowish diamond look whiter. High prong settings can also get the same effect to make the diamond look whiter, where channel setting or other sunken settings bring out the natural color of the stone. The diamond shapes of emerald or asscher too display more color compared to the brilliant cut due to the flat faceting. Especially a white metal bezel style setting in white diamond will perform better to make the color of your diamond appear whiter.
Irradiation
Irradiation is a laboratory process using high-energy subatomic particles to improve the color of the diamond. This method is used to create fancy colored diamonds. The high-energy particles like protons, neutrons, gamma rays and electrons, physically alter the diamond's crystal lattice, knocking carbon atoms out of place and producing color centers. A permanent method the color of the diamond does not change during regular wearing. Brown and yellow diamonds can be changed into fancy colored diamonds by irradiation, followed by high heat treatment. Diamonds reflecting faint hues of the color are irradiated to get intense uniform colors. It can create fancy colored diamonds in the shades of green, vivid yellow, blue, purple, red, black, etc. The color is generally permanent; but be careful with repairs, the diamond color can probably alter if high heat is employed throughout the setting repairs.
Make sure the diamond certificate clearly specifies whether the diamond is irradiated or natural. It is always advised to buy a diamond from a reputable retailer like MySolitaire.
High Pressure High Temperature Treatment (HPHT)
HPHT treatment can significantly lighten or permanently remove any color tints from an otherwise low-grade diamond. Primarily HPHT was utilized only to convert yellowish diamonds into fancy colored diamonds, but now it is also employed to alter some detested brownish diamonds into more expensive colorless diamonds. The process is used to correct the structural defects of the diamond known as plastic deformations. The high pressure and heat rectify this defect making the diamond look whiter.  Diamonds with nitrogen impurities present in the clusters can be HPHT to create fancy colored diamonds.
Gemological Institute of America (GIA) grading reports now notified when HTPT treatments are observed by putting forward "HPHT Annealed" or "Artificially Irradiated" in the Origins portion of a report. The treatments should be specifically mentioned on the diamond certificate accompanying the diamond.
Diamond Coating
Sometimes diamonds are over-coated with violet-blue dyes and vacuum-sputtered films to correct the color. The coating is fixed through heating, but may wear out in daily usage. This treatment is temporary, any contact with heat can eradicate the effect of the treatment. A yellowish diamond is coated vacuum-sputtered films to camouflages the yellow tint. Sometimes purple dots are applied on the diamonds, an artificial way to check the color wavelengths and dispersion. The purple dots help the diamond to emit whiter nuances due to the now includes colors. The dots are concealed under the prongs or settings.
The hardest to detect, Coating is an inferior treatments adopted to mostly deceive a consumer.
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Should you buy Treated Diamonds?

To buy or not to buy treated diamonds is a personal choice, but these can make a better pick if the treatment is permanent.

  • It is very difficult to differentiate between Treated diamonds and natural diamonds. In fact, the treated colored diamonds may appear better than the natural rare colored diamonds.
  • Natural colored diamonds or flawless white diamonds are very rare and exorbitantly prices, where as treated diamonds are less costly.
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    Did you know?

    • Diamonds falling under the G grade shows virtually no color to the unaided eye.
    • If you are planning for white gold or platinum setting, you may wish to opt for a higher color grade. If you have lower grade stone opt for the yellow gold setting.
    • Nearly all HPHT diamonds weigh over 1/2 carat.
    • Diamonds that bring out a blue reaction normally appear whiter, or more colorless, under UV light.
    • Diamonds can be identified by their high thermal conductivity

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